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Carl Gray Witkop Gallery

FOOTED VESSEL

Footed Vessel

Burnished Earthenware Vessel
12" High x 11" Wide
$1,500

GREEN WITH RED TALL VESSEL

Green with Red Tall Vessel

Burnished Earthenware Vessel
10" High x 8" Wide
$800

FOOTED VESSEL

Small Blue-Gray Pot

Burnished Earthenware Vessel
3" High x 4" Wide
$140

Red Tripod Pot

Red Tripod Pot

Burnished Earthenware Vessel
5" High x 7" Wide
$400

WEDDING VESSEL

Wedding Vessel

Burnished Earthenware Vessel
11" Wide
$1,750

ONEIROTHERION 

Oneirotherion

Burnished Earthenware Vessel
11" Wide
$2500

BIO

       Carl Gray Witkop was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan October 18, 1947. His mother Mary Worcester Witkop was an amateur artist and potter who gave Carl his first experience with clay. Inspired by pre-Columbian Mayan pottery which Carl saw during summers spent in Guatemala, Carl began experimenting with Native American pottery techniques in 1967. He was influenced in his earliest work by potter Hal Reiger and by Pueblo potters Popovi Da and Blue Corn. Carl studied anthropology and archaeology at Colorado State University during which time he discovered a demand for his unique self-taught potting techniques. He soon became a full time artist. Carl joined the art community in Taos County, New Mexico where he lived for twenty-one years. In 1996 he moved his studio to its' current location in Fannin County, Texas where his unique style of handmade pottery continues to evolve. Galleries have given Carl many one-artist shows. He has participated in juried and invitational shows where he has received several awards.

Tools & Techniques:
"I hand build vessels by the coil method. All of my pieces are hand burnished with a pebble to create a smooth shiny surface. I use no glaze. The base color of each piece depends on the natural color of the clay and on the color of different clays and oxides rubbed onto the surface before burnishing or texturing. I work with different tools as well as natural objects, such as twigs, nuts, seed pods, bones, stones, feathers and seashells to impress tooled or textured bands into the surface of the clay. The pots are fired using a combination of kiln and pit fire. In the firing I include various organic materials to produce oxidized and reduced areas of color on the surface. Many of these materials, like hair, feathers, leaves and other objects leave recognizable images on the finished pieces. I allow nature and accident to contribute to each creation." ---Carl Gray Witkop